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OH HEY ZTA!

Carolina Fireflies


Today I’m linking up with some fab ladies to bring you my experience as a Zeta Tau Alpha 🙂

Senior Year Formal

Yes, I was a sorority girl. Did I ever think I would be? HECK no. I had such a terrible stigma of sororities (as a lot of people do) when I went to college freshman year and I didn’t think it was for me. I didn’t have a ton of girl friends growing up and the last thing I wanted to do was befriend a bajillion of them. 

Greek Week Puddle Pull

But then I met some Zeta Tau Alpha’s in my Spanish class freshman year and fell in love. They were super sweet, helpful, kind, and of course, FUN. They were always sporting the cutest t-shirts and bags and I couldn’t wait to find out more about it. 
Pledge class (not all pictured…there were like 40 per pledge class)
So when rush came around, I kept a very open mind. I went to a school that is over 1/3 Greek… Greek life is HUGE. The first question you ever ask when you find out someone went to Miami University (in Ohio) is “were you in a fraternity or sorority?” You go to 20 sororities to start out; then back to 14, 7, 3, and then receive your bid. 
Welcoming the new “babies” (members/freshman)
So I rushed, and fell even more in love; with the girls, with their sisterhood, and with their philanthropy. Zeta Tau Alpha’s philanthropy is Breast Cancer Awareness and it was something I felt so strongly about, that I knew I wanted to devote my time and service to that. 
First social: Ski Bums and Snow Bunnies
So I became a ZTA! I choreographed dances when we were in competitions, I was Activities Chair, Sisterhood Chair, and Greek Week Chair, and junior year, I was elected onto Executive Council as Historian. 
Welcome to the Jungle social
Despite being in a sorority and making wonderful friends, most of my best friends were unafilliated. Sororities are not cults and yes, they do take up a lot of time, but it’s all about balance. 
American Gladiators social (also my 21st birthday whoop whoop)
Every sorority has a “family”; whether you call them Bigs, Littles, Moms, Grandmas, or whatever else some people call them, the concept is the same. You’re paired with someone older than you and they are your mentor throughout your experience in the sorority. When you become a sophomore, you take a freshman under your wing too, and so on. I had a wonderful family but unfortunately, I don’t talk to most of them anymore. But while in the moment, they were seriously such a blessing. 
On a scavenger hunt after finding out who are big was.
My favorite parts about being a ZTA were the crowns (obviously), the socials, and the formals. I loved getting dressed up for whatever the theme was that week and reliving my high school prom days at formal. 
Oh and the boys; fraternity boys are SUCH a great time. Zach was a Sigma Nu at my school, but we didn’t know each other in college. I dated a Sigma Pi and they lived across the street and it was looked down upon to “fraternize” with the enemy (get my little joke there? Ha). 
In the Navy social (in our sorority corridor)
Another cool thing about my school was that we didn’t have sorority houses. They were considered “brothels” and they weren’t allowed on campus. However, we were required to live in a “sorority corridor” sophomore year, which was basically an entire floor dedicated to the sorority. I still got the same experience of living in a house (minus all the strict rules) and loved it. 
Being in a sorority was such a great experience. My roommate freshman year also rushed ZTA and I loved spending all of my time with her. Yes, Sunday night Chapter meetings were less than convenient and exciting, but it was part of the gig. I loved the idea of being apart of something so small, yet so big across the country. It made my school a lot smaller and made me feel like I had a home away from home.
Were you a ZTA? I’d love to meet you!

 

“She’s super fab and puts the “Mer” in America…Check her out!”

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